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PTSD Symptoms…

Symptoms of PTSD are like….

・Reliving the event e.g. flashbacks, nightmares, night terrors.
・Avoiding reminders of the event e.g. numbing, sense of limited future, loss of interest in activities, isolation
・Hyperarousal e.g angry outbursts, feeling jumpy, Aggressive behavior
・Negative thought and mood changes e.g. guilt, shame, self-blame, difficulty concentrating or remembering things, depression

Written by TeresaGreninja91 from the app 7 Cups

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With my PTSD I have symptoms of…

Angry Outburst: Now a days when Im triggered I’ll become so easily angered. Over the top angry.

Jumpiness: When ever my dad slams a door I jump. I’ve had to tell my dad not to intentionally scare me it makes my whole body tingle. I go into anxiety overdrive.

Mood Changes: My moods can shifts rapidly if you trigger me.

Negative thoughts: I have negative thoughts about my self worth and thinking I’m not smart enough.

Difficulty concentrating or remembering things: My therapist kept on asking me if I was adhd. I have a hard time remembering things.

Depression : I deal with depression quite a bit. But I’m doing okay right now.

Loss of interest in activities: I get this a little bit with my photography. I loss interest even though I enjoy taking photos. My depression stops me.

Numbing: I believe I numb things out. Thus when anything happy or sad happens it’s extremely hard for me to feel anything.

Blacking things out: If I don’t like a situation I can sometimes blackout it out. I thought it was kinda a neat little trick. 🙂

Flashbacks: I’ve had one flashback where I went straight back to the situation and I smelt gasoline all around me. Flashbacks are no joke. A flashback is a damn scary experience.

#Bipolar #PTSD

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*Trigger Warning*

A few weeks ago I had two people I know die. My neighbor took his own life. I’m saddened that this happened. He was such a hard working good person. I wish he wouldn’t have left like that. In a car with a gun. Pretty brutal. My heart goes out to him. Then my uncle passed away due to cancer, I think. He’s as old as my dad. That’s just shocking, to me. I feel so bad for my cousins. 😦

Death is a sad thing.

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*Shine* How to *get up*

Michelle Kwan’s fallen 131,000 times on ice—and she has some sage wisdom on how to grow from a misstep. ⛸️

Want to learn more or try it out?

Have a cringeworthy moment lately, Jen? (cool, me neither.)

Seriously, we all slip. Read on for how Michelle Kwan bounced back.

We spend time learning how to *avoid* falling—but not really training how to *get up* when we do.

When we flex our bounce back? We can start to learn + grow quickly.

Next time you get up from a misstep, ask yourself Michelle Kwan’s go-to questions for growth:

1. What is it that I can change?
2. How can I improve?

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*Shine* Hope

What’s *one* hope you have for this week, Jen? 🤔 Today, name your aim.

Want to learn more or try it out?

Hopeful about this week, Jen? Gooood.

Hope is you *allowing* yourself to want something.

Today, unapologetically name your aim.

Sometimes, the scariest thing is to let go of our fear + embrace hope. 💛

But taking time to name our desires? It helps us know what we want.

Today, try this radical thing: Take 30 seconds and think of 1 thing you *want* to happen this week.

Get clear about what you desire—and savor that bit of hope.

Here’s to more hopeful Monday, Jen.

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Lost My Medication-Memory Issues?

I’ve been struggling with my memory lately. First I lost my medication at the beggining of this month, a day after I got it. Five days ago I got a ride home from a nice older lady and left my purse in her car. I had all my medication inside of it. So for the past four days I’ve gone without my Effexor which has horrible side effects if you stop cold turkey. Aspecially if your me… and on the highest does possible of the medication. Thus I have not been able to function properly for days. I’m surprised I’m even able to write this blog. I contacted my psychiatrist and hopefully she’ll be able to help me. But this is just one of the downfalls to having a horrible memory and no medication.

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PTSD and Short Term Memory Loss

Written by TIA HOLLOWOOD
PTSD impacts short-term memory for specific reasons. Learn why PTSD causes short-term memory problems, how to deal with it and how to know if it gets serious.
For many individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), short-term memory loss is a significant concern. While working to calm and organize memories of trauma, individuals with PTSD may also struggle to recall simple, everyday information. Short-term memory loss can leave an individual with PTSD with concerns over deteriorating cognitive functioning, and uncertainty about just how much forgetfulness is reasonable and how much becomes a medical concern.
check both of my reminder lists.
Take each task to completion with as little distraction as possible. If you’re headed for the kitchen to get water, think about what glass to use, or how cold you want it. Pay attention to the little things so often done without thinking because we’re busy planning out the rest of the things we need to accomplish.
If your concerns about your memory are impacting your ability to carry on with your regular daily routine, or if loved ones are expressing concerns over your recall, discuss your concerns with a healthcare professional. There are many other causes of short-term memory lossrm memory for specific reasons. Learn why PTSD causes short-term memory problems, how to deal with it and how to know if it gets serious.
For many individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), short-term memory loss is a significant concern. While working to calm and organize memories of trauma, individuals with PTSD may also struggle to recall simple, everyday information. Short-term memory loss can leave an individual with PTSD with concerns over deteriorating cognitive functioning, and uncertainty about just how much forgetfulness is reasonable and how much becomes a medical concern.

How to Identify Short-Term Memory Loss from PTSD
Short-term memory loss with PTSD results in symptoms we often label as “forgetful.” Have you ever forgotten if you’ve fed a pet, why you walked into a room, or if you took your medications? All of these are related to short-term memory. Short-term memory declines with age but is distinguishable from memory issues related to dementia by the type of information that is forgotten.

With short-term memory, reminders can help you recall what you did or said, or it may come back to you later. With advancing dementia, the ability to recollect how to use everyday objects, the names of familiar people, and how to perform typical tasks such as buttoning a shirt can become impossible.
PTSD, the Hippocampus, and Short-Term Memory
The culprit involved with short-term memory challenges and PTSD is the hippocampus. The hippocampus is an organ in the brain that regulates emotions, stores long-term memories and helps us distinguish old memories from new. Studies of individuals with PTSD have found that PTSD damages the hippocampus, reducing it in volume by an average of eight percent. Not only does PTSD lead to flashbacks, anxiety and disjointed memories of traumatic events, PTSD also damages the brain’s ability to convert short-term memories into long-term memories.
PTSD, SSRIs, and Short Term Memory
There have been several studies on the impact of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), medications commonly prescribed to individuals with PTSD, on short-term memory loss. The results of these studies have varied from indicating that SSRIs actually may improve memory skills to demonstrating that SSRIs result in a loss of working memory skills in as little as two months after beginning the medication. While the verdict is still out on the potential for long-term damage to memory skills, there is enough evidence to discuss any concerns over how SSRIs may impact your memory with your doctor.